In honor of National Senior Citizens Day today, we organized a flash dance in Philadelphia’s Rittenhouse Park featuring a bunch of swingin’ seniors.  Enjoy!

ncpssm:

A sad realization for some seniors being affected by the sequester.

This is terrible.  Anything we can do to help?

ncpssm:

A sad realization for some seniors being affected by the sequester.

This is terrible.  Anything we can do to help?

Checking out at the store, the young cashier suggested to the older woman, that she should bring her own grocery bags because plastic bags weren’t good for the environment.The woman apologized and explained, “We didn’t have this green thing back in my earlier days.” The young clerk responded, “That’s our problem today. Your generation did not care enough to save our environment f or future generations.”She was right — our generation didn’t have the green thing in its day.Back then, we returned milk bottles, soda bottles and beer bottles to the store. The store sent them back to the plant to be washed and sterilized and refilled, so it could use the same bottles over and over. So they really were truly recycled. But we didn’t have the green thing back in our day.Grocery stores bagged our groceries in brown paper bags, that we reused for numerous things, most memorable besides household garbage bags, was the use of brown paper bags as book covers for our schoolbooks. This was to ensure that public property, (the books provided for our use by the school) was not defaced by our scribbling’s. Then we were able to personalize our books on the brown paper bags. But too bad we didn’t do the green thing back then.We walked up stairs, because we didn’t have an escalator in every store and office building. We walked to the grocery store and didn’t climb into a 300-horsepower machine every time we had to go two blocks. But she was right. We didn’t have the green thing in our day. Back then, we washed the baby’s diapers because we didn’t have the throwaway kind. We dried clothes on a line, not in an energy-gobbling machine burning up 220 volts — wind and solar power really did dry our clothes back in our early days. Kids got hand-me-down clothes from their brothers or sisters, not always brand-new clothing. But that young lady is right; we didn’t have the green thing back in our day.Back then, we had one TV, or radio, in the house — not a TV in every room. And the TV had a small screen the size of a handkerchief (remember them?), not a screen the size of the state of Montana.In the kitchen, we blended and stirred by hand because we didn’t have electric machines to do everything for us. When we packaged a fragile item to send in the mail, we used wadded up old newspapers to cushion it, not Styrofoam or plastic bubble wrap.Back then, we didn’t fire up an engine and burn gasoline just to cut the lawn. We used a push mower that ran on human power. We exercised by working so we didn’t need to go to a health club to run on treadmills that operate on electricity. But she’s right; we didn’t have the green thing back then.We drank from a fountain when we were thirsty instead of using a cup or a plastic bottle every time we had a drink of water. We refilled writing pens with ink instead of buying a new pen, and we replaced the razor blades in a razor instead of throwing away the whole razor just because the blade got dull. But we didn’t have the green thing back then.Back then, people took the streetcar or a bus and kids rode their bikes to school or walked instead of turning their moms into a 24-hour taxi service. We had one electrical outlet in a room, not an entire bank of sockets to power a dozen appliances. And we didn’t need a computerized gadget to receive a signal beamed from satellites 23,000 miles out in space in order to find the nearest burger joint.But isn’t it sad the current generation laments how wasteful we old folks were just because we didn’t have the green thing back then? 

Checking out at the store, the young cashier suggested to the older woman, that she should bring her own grocery bags because plastic bags weren’t good for the environment.

The woman apologized and explained, “We didn’t have this green thing back in my earlier days.” The young clerk responded, “That’s our problem today. Your generation did not care enough to save our environment f or future generations.”

She was right — our generation didn’t have the green thing in its day.

Back then, we returned milk bottles, soda bottles and beer bottles to the store. The store sent them back to the plant to be washed and sterilized and refilled, so it could use the same bottles over and over. So they really were truly recycled. But we didn’t have the green thing back in our day.

Grocery stores bagged our groceries in brown paper bags, that we reused for numerous things, most memorable besides household garbage bags, was the use of brown paper bags as book covers for our schoolbooks. This was to ensure that public property, (the books provided for our use by the school) was not defaced by our scribbling’s. Then we were able to personalize our books on the brown paper bags. But too bad we didn’t do the green thing back then.

We walked up stairs, because we didn’t have an escalator in every store and office building. We walked to the grocery store and didn’t climb into a 300-horsepower machine every time we had to go two blocks. But she was right. We didn’t have the green thing in our day. 

Back then, we washed the baby’s diapers because we didn’t have the throwaway kind. We dried clothes on a line, not in an energy-gobbling machine burning up 220 volts — wind and solar power really did dry our clothes back in our early days. Kids got hand-me-down clothes from their brothers or sisters, not always brand-new clothing. But that young lady is right; we didn’t have the green thing back in our day.

Back then, we had one TV, or radio, in the house — not a TV in every room. And the TV had a small screen the size of a handkerchief (remember them?), not a screen the size of the state of Montana.

In the kitchen, we blended and stirred by hand because we didn’t have electric machines to do everything for us. When we packaged a fragile item to send in the mail, we used wadded up old newspapers to cushion it, not Styrofoam or plastic bubble wrap.

Back then, we didn’t fire up an engine and burn gasoline just to cut the lawn. We used a push mower that ran on human power. We exercised by working so we didn’t need to go to a health club to run on treadmills that operate on electricity. But she’s right; we didn’t have the green thing back then.

We drank from a fountain when we were thirsty instead of using a cup or a plastic bottle every time we had a drink of water. We refilled writing pens with ink instead of buying a new pen, and we replaced the razor blades in a razor instead of throwing away the whole razor just because the blade got dull. But we didn’t have the green thing back then.

Back then, people took the streetcar or a bus and kids rode their bikes to school or walked instead of turning their moms into a 24-hour taxi service. We had one electrical outlet in a room, not an entire bank of sockets to power a dozen appliances. And we didn’t need a computerized gadget to receive a signal beamed from satellites 23,000 miles out in space in order to find the nearest burger joint.

But isn’t it sad the current generation laments how wasteful we old folks were just because we didn’t have the green thing back then? 

Kudos to Kathy Ruffing at the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities for her research highlighted in today’s  Off the Charts blog post.

“U.S. seniors are more likely to be in the workforce than their peers in almost every other developed country. Nearly 30 percent of Americans ages 65 through 69 were employed in 2012.  That’s about three times the European average, according to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (see chart).”

What was your #Grandma’s signature dish?

We love Betty Halbreich, the 85-year-old stunner who has worked as a personal shopper at Bergdorf Goodman’s since 1976.  Click this link to learn more about Betty, who is honest, open and FABULOUS!

We love Betty Halbreich, the 85-year-old stunner who has worked as a personal shopper at Bergdorf Goodman’s since 1976.  Click this link to learn more about Betty, who is honest, open and FABULOUS!

iamadirtyfoot:

10 People Over 70 Who Are Fitter Than You
http://fitbie.msn.com/slideshow/inspiring-athletes-senior-citizens
Featured above, Sister Madonna Buder, 82

This might be the closest we get to a real-life flying nun. Sister Madonna Buder, known as the Iron Nun, has completed more than 340 triathlons, including dozens of Ironman-class races. In fact, the 75-to-79 age group category was created just for her at the 2005 Ironman World Championship in Kona, HI. She’s the oldest women to ever have completed an Ironman triathlon, and holds several age-group records. The Roman Catholic nun’s athletic career began in her late 40s when she started running for spiritual enrichment. Eventually, she integrated cycling and swimming into her routine in her 50s. You can read about her experiences in her memoir, The Grace to Race.

iamadirtyfoot:

10 People Over 70 Who Are Fitter Than You

http://fitbie.msn.com/slideshow/inspiring-athletes-senior-citizens

Featured above, Sister Madonna Buder, 82

This might be the closest we get to a real-life flying nun. Sister Madonna Buder, known as the Iron Nun, has completed more than 340 triathlons, including dozens of Ironman-class races. In fact, the 75-to-79 age group category was created just for her at the 2005 Ironman World Championship in Kona, HI. She’s the oldest women to ever have completed an Ironman triathlon, and holds several age-group records. The Roman Catholic nun’s athletic career began in her late 40s when she started running for spiritual enrichment. Eventually, she integrated cycling and swimming into her routine in her 50s. You can read about her experiences in her memoir, The Grace to Race.

How can you not love Lucy?!

How can you not love Lucy?!

Remembering Dr. Joyce Brothers, 1927-2013.  She dedicated her life to helping others.  She will be missed.

Remembering Dr. Joyce Brothers, 1927-2013. She dedicated her life to helping others. She will be missed.